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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
is allowing family members of u.s. government workers in japan to evacuate. arrangements are being made for charter flights. an earlier white house order told americans in japan to stay at least 50 miles away from the fukushima nuclear plant. japanese military helicopters have been dropping water on that crippled plant today. they're hoping the aerial assault will cool off the reactors and avoid a total meltdown. >>> the japanese stock market opened lower today. taking back yesterday's gains. the yen soared to a new high against the dollar on the currency markets. >>> finally, while the world watches the tragic events in japan, many wonder what we can do here to help. this includes one little massachusetts girl. >> she sprang into action selling her most precious items in hopes that she can help those who need it the most. here's tricia taskey of our affiliate wggb. >> here. >> this is autumn. and it's going to be hard for me to give her away. >> reporter: 7-year-old sage freeman is parting with some of her toys. >> this is tigger. >> tigger is going to be hard. >> reporter: the florenc
there for the u.s. dollars is $32 a bulb. >> we were inspired. we both designed a bulb and installed them here. let's see how they >>> this morning on "world news now" -- breaking news. the nuclear threat in japan forces president obama to begin american evacuations. >> and because of a meltdown risk, families of u.s. embassy employees in japan are being urged to get out. it's thursday, march 17th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> and good morning, everyone, i'm mike marusarz in for rob nelson. >> i'm peggy bunker. that late development about evacuations of u.s. embassy families comes as a japanese military takes desperate steps to avoid a nuclear meltdown. can choppers with water make any difference? >>> also ahead, tough questions about nuclear safety here in the u.s. as the president stands by his plans to build more plants. >>> also, one very personal fund-raiser for tsunami and earthquake survivors in japan. a little girl's successful plan to sell her toys in order to raise money. a very sweet story. >> it is a sweet story. >>> we begin with that urgent action to
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
. the u.s. tells americans to evacuate the danger zone and sends in planes to get them out of japan. >>> and two exclusive interviews. tiger and trump. we go airborne with donald trump, who is sounding more like a candidate for president. >> part of the beauty of me is that i'm very rich. if i need $600 million, i can put up $600 million myself. >> and tiger tees off about his frustrations on the golf course. and the challenge of living life as a single dad. >>> and good morning, america, e on this st. patrick's day. the latest developments this morning. steam still rising from three of those nuclear reactors. one of those, worse, in fact. it shows the plant at a very critical point. and japanese officials saying, a slight radiation increase is too small to harm the people around tokyo. >> here's what happened when you were asleep. you saw the military helicopters. they tried to dump 30 tons of sea water on the reactors. they go over it. and a lot of the water dissipates before it hits them. even if all of it went in, all 30 tons, that would be a drop in the bucket. just to give you
in libya. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's perhaps, monday or tuesday of next week. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of a u.s. ally. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyon
, is it possible for the u.s. to become a country of secular atheists that is also ruled by radical islamists? newt gingrich seems to think so. that's in "the sideshow." >>> we're going to start with president obama's speech on libya. howard fineman is the senior political editor for "the huffington post," and susan page. the washington bureau chief for "usa today" and i have to call her madam president of the gridiron. and she's on there today. howard and susan, at first we outlined four questions for president obama to answer in his speech and today we'll see how he did. first, take a look at some of the republican responses to the speech since he gave it. >> he made a very puzzling comment, and that was regime change by force would be a mistake. gadhafi must have been somewhat comforted by that. >> now we're in this position of having a president of the united states saying gadhafi must go but we're not going to necessarily make him go. >> how our commander in chief chose to handle this new dilemma raises serious questions about his understanding of constitutional checks and balances. while the
. violence rips law the middle east and the arab world. and now the u.s. is handed over control of the no-fly zone to nato but the u.s. military is still deeply involved. so what is going on? a live report moments away. and a muslim teacher asks for three weeks off to go on a pilgrimage and the school says "no way," she did not work there long enough and the department of justice is suing the school. what is up with that? >> states want to tax big corporations to fix their deficit instead of changing policy so now one big company, caterpillar, employs thousands of people, is ready to flee illinois. could this happen in your state? we continue right now with "fox and friends" this morning. >> welcome, everyone. you are watching "fox and friends" today. >> welcome to "fox and friends" on saturday morning. thank you for waking up with us. that is dave briggs and heather is here and i am clayton. >> lots going on today. >>dave: we start with new developments in libya where rebels have retaken the key town of ajdabiya after a fierce battle with muammar qaddafi forces and rick is live inside th
there are no shortages, just worries. the white house says it's considering of tapping into the 727 million barrels of u.s. strategic oil reserves. >> it's something done on rare occasions. >> the strategic oil reserve is there for emergencies. this is not an emergency. >> reporter: one oil analyst says there's political pressure. for the president to lower prices. >> he can say, i can do something, and you are better off. what elected official would not want to do that. >> reporter: in the meantime, the squeeze is on. >> it's hard to ask our customers for increases right now. so we really have to suck it up and that really hurts. >> reporter: leaving drivers and gas tanks with an increasingly empty feeling. some analysts say when gas gets above $4 a gallon demands prices drop. but in many parts of the country, $4 a gallon gas is now a reality. rob and peggy. >> emily, thanks a lot. >>> that unrest in the middle east shows no signs of slowing. in libya, rebel forces say they're going to regroup and bring in heavy weapons. this after a punishing weekend of air strikes by forces loyal to leader moammar gadh
. >> reporter: good morning, meredith. the u.s. and its allies are escalating pressure on moammar gadhafi. the justice department is being asked to open a new investigation into whether the libyan leader personally ordered one of the worst terror attacks in u.s. history. for than two decades after more than 200 people including 189 americans died in the lockerbie bombing reports that moammar gadhafi may have ordered the attack, sparking calls for a new investigation. >> there have been statements made by what are now former members of the libyan government fingering gadhafi, making it clear that the order came from the very top. i think we need to move expeditiously. >> reporter: this after two administrations -- bush and obama -- dealt with gadhafi. some of the families of the victims have written to president obama and say they are furious, sickened. receive any bernstein's husband was on the flight. >> we have chosen to look the other way because of business interests, because for some reason we thought we could bring gadhafi into the family of civilized nations. we now know how wrong
floated by officials to make us screen all letters that are being sent by the u.s. postal service. something like that would drive up the cost of security immensely so that's a way that you can really mess with the system even without executing a successful attack. >> david ross, thanks so much for your insightful analysis. appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >> i hope you're wrong. meanwhile, gretchen, steve, what do you got? >> thank you very much for asking. >> the orca that killed a trainer is back in action. he was greeted with wild applause. is this really a bad idea? a man who trained those animals says that animal could kill again and will. he'll join us. >> president obama wants us to all go green. take a look at what happened in one state when they tried to do it. yes, those are 3 x 5 foot solar panels on the street. the story coming up next. [ male announcer ] at e-trade, investing means taking action with professional-grade research. and some of the most powerful, yet easy to use trading tools on the planet. it's investing with intelligence and cold hard conviction. e-trad
with that amount of money. we have this to report. general david petraeus, the top u.s. commander in afghanistan is apologizing for a nato air strike that killed 9 afghan children yesterday. in a statement petraeus said we are deeply sorry for this tragedy and apologized to members of the afghan government, the people of afghanistan and most importantly, the surviving family members of those killed by our actions. these deaths should have never happened. i will personally apologize to president karzai. military officials attributed the error to faulty communication as an air weapons team responded to an attack on a nato base. however, the strike is likely to increase already high tensions between karzai and nato commanders who came under scrutiny last month because of another case in which dozens of civilians were allegedly killed. >> we're putting our sons and daughters in an unwinnable situation. this as a parent of young children, this is an unspeakable tragedy. you also, though, look at the americans that are looking up from above, in a country they don't know, trying to figure out whether t
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)